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George of Trebizond and his Martyrology of St. Andreas of Chios: Edition, Translation, Commentaries

Ksenia Lobovikova, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Summer Fellow 2011
The main goal of my project was to prepare a modern edition and English translation of the martyrology of Saint Andreas of Chios, which was written in 1468 by George of Trebizond, a Greek émigré in Italy, a famous man of letters, and a curial official. Following the advice of Ihor Ševčenko to students of hagiography—first of all to produce reliable translations of Lives of the saints into modern languages—I concentrated on making an English translation of the Latin text, which has never been translated before. The second part of my project was preparing commentaries to the text. In my research, I tried to answer the following questions: Why did a famous rhetorician like George of Trebizond decide to write the Life of Saint Andreas? To whom was the Vita addressed? What was the main message of the martyrology? Was Saint Andreas an Orthodox or a Catholic? In which Galata church was the body of the saint buried after his death? We have an anonymous Greek passio of Saint Andreas (Cod. Oxon. Bodl. Canonic. 126), and comparing these texts helped to answer some of these questions. Another task was to compare the Life of Saint Andreas with other Lives of Byzantine neo-martyrs of the late Palaiologan period and early Ottoman times: the Lives of Saint Niketas the Young, Saint Theodoros the Young, Saint Michael of Alexandria, Saint Michael Mauroeides of Adrianople, and Saint George of Adrianople. Many Lives of the saints were also written in the Quattrocento in the Italian circle of humanists to which George of Trebizond belonged. During this fellowship I have tried to locate the Life of Saint Andreas in the context of Latin hagiography of the Renaissance.

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