Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss, April 11, 1936

Finance Ministry

Budapest

11.IV.36

Bless you for your wire that has just come, dearest Mildred. It’s an Easter message that does me much good. I hope you’ll have found a Byz. Mass for tomorrow—but Rome isn’t a very propitious place for one.

I’m nearly dead, having been toiling at a very arduous report, and in the intervals negociating a bank-merger involving getting the London creditors to make sacrifices—it succeeded the day the news about Bill came. And now, just in case one were to find the Easter holiday hang heavy on one’s hands, a blighter from BâleBasel, in German, the third largest city in Switzerland. arrives here tomorrow (Easter day) to discuss our debts to the Bank for International Settlements!

Well, as ArpádRoyall Tyler’s use of Arpád is probably meant to signify “Hungarian.” Tyler uses typical first names to indicate nationalities in later letters. See letter of October 27, 1939. The historical Árpád (ca. 840–ca. 907) was, according to the Byzantine emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus, the first head of the confederation of Hungarian tribes. says: “Sose volt, hogy valahogy sem leket volna” = “It never was so that it couldn’t be somehow.”

Fond love—

R. T.

 
Associated Places: Budapest (Hungary)