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Athanasios (?) protekdikos (?) and sakellarios (ninth century)

 
 

Obverse

Bust of the Virgin, nimbate, holding the medallion of Christ before her. Inscription: ΘΕ̅|ΟΙ: Θεοτόκε βοίθει. Linear border.

Θεοτόκε βοίθει

Reverse

Inscription in four lines. No visible border.

αθ...
πρ,εκ
κ,σακκ
λαρι.

Ἀθανασίῳ (?) πρωτεκδίκ (?) καὶ σακκελαρί

Obverse

Bust of the Virgin, nimbate, holding the medallion of Christ before her. Inscription: ΘΕ̅|ΟΙ: Θεοτόκε βοίθει. Linear border.

Θεοτόκε βοίθει

Reverse

Inscription in four lines. No visible border.

αθ...
πρ,εκ
κ,σακκ
λαρι.

Ἀθανασίῳ (?) πρωτεκδίκ (?) καὶ σακκελαρί

Accession number BZS.1955.1.4775
Diameter 21.0 mm
Previous Editions

Laurent, Corpus V/3, no. 1644.

Translation

Θεοτόκε βοίθει Ἀθανασίῳ (?) πρωτεκδίκῳ (?) καὶ σακκελαρίῳ.

Theotokos, help Athanasios (?) protekdikos (?) and sakellarios.

Commentary

The restoration of the name is uncertain--there seems to be the remnants of an Α before the Θ in the top line, which would render this name Athanasios, however if this A is not present, then the name could be any number of names beginning with Θ (i.e. Theodore, Theodosios, etc.). Laurent, misreads the second line, where there is clearly a ΠΡ, before the ΕΚ. The ΠΡ, can be interpreted in three ways: either this individual is a πρώτῳ (protos), a πρεσβύτερῳ (priest), or this forms the first part of the next word, and he is a πρωτεκδίκου (protekdikos). The former is the least likely, especially with the other two offices this individual owns. That he is a priest is entirely possible--but seems slightly less likely based on its placement foremost within the inscription and its abbreviation here without a καὶ thereafter, than the latter possibility, that this individual is the head of the ekdikoi, the protekdikos. This would be an unusually early seal of a protekdikos, but the position had existed since the late seventh century (ODB, "protekdikos").