You are here:Home/Resources/ Byzantine Seals/ Search the Catalogue/ Andrew proedros (= metropolitan) of Crete (eighth century)

Andrew proedros (= metropolitan) of Crete (eighth century)

 
 

Obverse

Bust of St. Titos offering a blessing and holding book. Vertical inscription: Ο|Α|ΓΙ|Ο|Σ|Τ|Ι|ΤΟ|Σ: ὁ ἅγιος Τίτος. Wreath border.

Reverse

Cruciform monogram: Ἀνδρέαν. Within concentric circles of dots a circular inscription beginning at the top.

ΚΡΗΤΗΣΠΡΟΕΔΡΟΝΧΡΙΣΤΕΣΖΟΙΣ

Κρήτης πρόεδρον, Χριστὲ, σῴζοις Ἀνδρέαν

Obverse

Bust of St. Titos offering a blessing and holding book. Vertical inscription: Ο|Α|ΓΙ|Ο|Σ|Τ|Ι|ΤΟ|Σ: ὁ ἅγιος Τίτος. Wreath border.

Reverse

Cruciform monogram: Ἀνδρέαν. Within concentric circles of dots a circular inscription beginning at the top.

ΚΡΗΤΗΣΠΡΟΕΔΡΟΝΧΡΙΣΤΕΣΖΟΙΣ

Κρήτης πρόεδρον, Χριστὲ, σῴζοις Ἀνδρέαν

Accession number BZS.1958.106.5521
Diameter 29.0 mm; field: 25.0 mm
Previous Editions

DO Seals 2, no. 36.8a.
Zacos-Veglery, no. 1293 (this specimen, our parallel and a third specimen).
Cf. Laurent, Corpus V/1, no. 619, who reedited a parallel specimen, found at Knossos and kept in the Herakleion Museum, first published by S. Xanthoudides, EEBS 2 (1925) 44-47 (illustrated, 48, no. 7). Laurent illustrates this specimen.
Cf. also SBS 2 (1990) 144, no. 3.

Translation

Κρήτης πρόεδρον, Χριστὲ, σῴζοις Ἀνδρέαν.

Christ, save Andrew, metropolitan of Crete.

Commentary

Dodecasyllabic verse made by the circular inscription complemented by the monogram. After long discussion and hesitation (cf. EO 32 [1933] 399), Laurent accepted the early 8th century date proposed for this seal by Xanthoudides; Zacos-Veglery gave the same date with new arguments. To what has already been said, we can add that this monogram, surrounded by a circular inscription, is typical of the eighth century not only in Italy but also in Thessalonica (Dated Seals, nos. 35 and 37) and that the  with broken horizontal bar tends to disappear by the mid-eighth century. The owner of this seal must have been the famous hymnographer Andrew of Crete (ordained in 710/11 or later; died 740), whose see had at the time close relations with Thessalonica while both were under the jurisdiction of Rome (Tsougarakis, Crete, 203 ff).