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Homes that Architects Have Built for Themselves: House & Garden, December 1911

 
Accession number AR.EP.MG.0656
Creator
Places
Westbury (New York [United States])
New York (United States)
United Kingdom
Date
1911
Work types
magazine

Description

TRANSCRIPTION

House & Garden / December 1911 / 25c $3 a year
A Holiday Issue of Inspiration
Travel / House & Garden
McBride, Nast & Co. / New York

[359] Cover Design: From a photograph by Herbert D. Angell
Volume XX / Number 6

[375] Homes That Architects Have Built for Themselves
The Long Island home of Mr. Thomas Hastings at Westbury
By Henry H. Saylor / Photographs by Robert W. Tebbs

Here is a fact that seems not to be very widely recognized in connection with building a home. It is that the most successful home as a general rule, is the one built as an expression of one dominating idea....

The main entrance to the house is through the quadrangle, in which the marble-trimmed arch marks the doorway to the main hall [photo]

The paneled dining-room is at one side of the terrace front, with a porch at its end. On the other side is the living-room symmetrical with it [photo]

[376] The four box-stalls for the thoroughbreds have their doors and windows opening upon this view over the court. The service wing of the house is at the left, partly enclosing the quadrangle [photo]

In the entrance gates Mr. Hastings has given a freer rein to his fancy for color, using terra cotta with the brickwork [photo]

[377] The stable group is at the lower end of the plan, forming one end of the quadrangle [photo]

The same rough-textured brick is used in the stable walls, and the inside of this building is as well kept as the house at the opposite end of the court [photo]

EXHIBITION

Transplanting the Renaissance: Italian Villa Gardens in America, 1900-1940
May-August 2018

The first few decades of the 20th century saw a boom in garden and home magazines featuring Italianate gardens. Model garden templates, articles highlighting private estates, and advertisements for landscape designers became widely available across the country. These three magazines (also here and here), dating from 1911 to 1930, all sport lavish color illustrations of Italian-inspired gardens on their covers, demonstrating the breadth and importance of this style to American home-makers. A decrease in price for the 1930 publication—at the start of the Great Depression—allowed it to remain affordable amidst the economic downturn.

Collection

Ephemera Collection
 

Repository

Dumbarton Oaks Archives, 054.SUZ.02.PCbox.097
Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC
Accession number AR.EP.MG.0656
Creator
Places
Westbury (New York [United States])
New York (United States)
United Kingdom
Date
1911
Work types
magazine

Index Terms

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