Images

Images for 2005–2006 project grant reports
Fig. 1: Gold, pearl, and emerald earring (SF6507) (Lightfoot 2005–2006)

Fig. 1: Gold, pearl, and emerald earring (SF6507) (Lightfoot 2005–2006)

Fig. 1: Gold, pearl, and emerald earring (SF6507) found in a Dark Age occupation layer in the Lower City Enclosure during the 2005 season (photo Edward Schoolman)

Fig. 1: Gold, pearl, and emerald earring (SF6507) (Lightfoot 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 1: View from the top of Cerro Colorado (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 1: View from the top of Cerro Colorado (Peters 2005–2006)

View from the top of Cerro Colorado, over the twin knobs of the Wari Kayan hillside. The Necropolis funerary bundles, massed on that hillside, faced to the north towards this view of the bay of Paracas.

Fig. 1: View from the top of Cerro Colorado (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 2: Peters' reconstruction of phases of excavation of the Necropolis cemetery groups (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 2: Peters' reconstruction of phases of excavation of the Necropolis cemetery groups (Peters 2005–2006)

Peters' reconstruction of phases of excavation of the Necropolis cemetery groups, based on site excavation notes made by Toribio Mejía Xesspe and Julio C, Tello in 1927–28.

Fig. 2: Peters' reconstruction of phases of excavation of the Necropolis cemetery groups (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 3: Conservator Maria Ysabel Medina and curator Carmen Thays direct and collaborate in conservation, restoration and stable mounting of the Paracas embroideries (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 3: Conservator Maria Ysabel Medina and curator Carmen Thays direct and collaborate in conservation, restoration and stable mounting of the Paracas embroideries (Peters 2005–2006)

Conservator Maria Ysabel Medina and curator Carmen Thays direct and collaborate in conservation, restoration and stable mounting of the Paracas embroideries. Here they work with textile conservators Luis Peña, Mónica Solorzano, and Lourdes Chocano to prepare a Paracas mantle for one of several international exhibits in 2006.

Fig. 3: Conservator Maria Ysabel Medina and curator Carmen Thays direct and collaborate in conservation, restoration and stable mounting of the Paracas embroideries (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 4: Haydeé Grandez created a stabilizing mounting for a fragmentary fan (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 4: Haydeé Grandez created a stabilizing mounting for a fragmentary fan (Peters 2005–2006)

Haydeé Grandez created a stabilizing mounting for a fragmentary fan that conserves access to data on its provenience and museum records, and facilitates observation of its structure and components.

Fig. 4: Haydeé Grandez created a stabilizing mounting for a fragmentary fan (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 5: Published and archival sources (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 5: Published and archival sources (Peters 2005–2006)

Published and archival sources are brought together to resolve issues of object identification and improve contextual information on hundreds of vegetable fiber slings, boxed and ready to go into the Textiles department's climate-controlled storeroom.

Fig. 5: Published and archival sources (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 6: Archival assistant Alberto Ayarza creates a portrait of Paracas Necropolis bundle 298 (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 6: Archival assistant Alberto Ayarza creates a portrait of Paracas Necropolis bundle 298 (Peters 2005–2006)

Archival assistant Alberto Ayarza creates a portrait of Paracas Necropolis bundle 298, recently studied by the Museum research and conservation team. An art historian and graphic artist, Ayarza has documented both excavation descriptions and visual records.

Fig. 6: Archival assistant Alberto Ayarza creates a portrait of Paracas Necropolis bundle 298 (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 7: Melina La Torre photographs a fragmentary open-sided tunic with feathered decoration (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 7: Melina La Torre photographs a fragmentary open-sided tunic with feathered decoration (Peters 2005–2006)

Melina La Torre photographs a fragmentary open-sided tunic with feathered decoration, after removing salts and mold and stitching protective tulle netting over the areas of featherwork.

Fig. 7: Melina La Torre photographs a fragmentary open-sided tunic with feathered decoration (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 14: Franco Mora and Lin Chalco carry the remains of a previously unwrapped Necropolis burial (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 14: Franco Mora and Lin Chalco carry the remains of a previously unwrapped Necropolis burial (Peters 2005–2006)

Franco Mora and Lin Chalco carry the remains of a previously unwrapped Necropolis burial out of the storeroom for inventory, cleaning and transfer to a more stable storage context.

Fig. 14: Franco Mora and Lin Chalco carry the remains of a previously unwrapped Necropolis burial (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 17: Carlos Murga designed a box for storing two human heads (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 17: Carlos Murga designed a box for storing two human heads (Peters 2005–2006)

Carlos Murga designed a box for storing two human heads with well-preserved headdresses, including individual padded trays to minimize direct handling.

Fig. 17: Carlos Murga designed a box for storing two human heads (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 20: Rosa Martinez cleans a gourd from the Paracas site (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 20: Rosa Martinez cleans a gourd from the Paracas site (Peters 2005–2006)

Rosa Martinez cleans a gourd from the Paracas site while her son observes, on a break from the Museum's summer youth education program.

Fig. 20: Rosa Martinez cleans a gourd from the Paracas site (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…

Fig. 22: This basket was one of those used to develop the Paracas site basket typologies (Peters 2005–2006)

Fig. 22: This basket was one of those used to develop the Paracas site basket typologies (Peters 2005–2006)

This basket was one of those used to develop the Paracas site basket typologies. Despite efforts made to reinforce the basket in the 1940s, the fibers contain salts that make it liable to destruction in the humid air of Lima. A stitched cloth label from the 1940s endures in good condition, while lettering on a more recent tag has been eaten away.

Fig. 22: This basket was one of those used to develop the Paracas site basket typologies (Peters 2005–2006) - Read More…